KEEPING OUR STORIES ALIVE

What Happened on this Day in Queer History?

What Happened on this Day in Queer History?

What Happened on this Day in Queer History?

Day of Silence
[“Day of Silence” by Gitgat is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0]

By: Jeff Baillargeon

A new project inaugurated by our publication on the Day of Silence, April 24th, What Happened on this Day in Queer History consists of a series of critical short essays paying homage to the important events that have shaped queer history in Canada.

As a form of community engagement, this initiative seeks to celebrate important cultural and political milestones, such as the decriminalization of homosexuality in 1969, or the airing of the first episode of Coming Out in 1972, the first Canadian television program specifically targeted to a queer audience. While paying homage to well-known events, the project also seeks to raise awareness about the work that is done ‘behind the scenes,’ and the work that is still left to be done. In doing so, it seeks to bring to light the marginalized—or since forgotten—events formative to our history. These, for example, include the partnering of the Toronto-based AIDS Action Now!, the Montreal-based Réaction-SIDA, and the New York-based ACT UP in 1989, who, in storming the stage of the 5th International AIDS conference in Montreal to protest their exclusion from the event, were ultimately responsible for securing the presence of activist groups at future conferences. Though a celebration of triumphant moments, the What Happened on this Day in Queer History? will also shed light on the darker moments in our history that served as catalysts for greater cultural and political change within the queer community, and Canadian society more generally. These include the bathhouse raids of the 70s and 80s, and the tragic murders and assaults of countless queer individuals.

As a form of community engagement this initiative is also an invitation for the community to write back to us. The practice of writing history is always incomplete, there are always events and peoples who have been overlooked, or overshadowed. It is our hope that in extending this project to you, we can bring to light these hidden histories. If you have any moments in history you would like to see broadcast on The ArQuives’ platforms, please email them to jeffmbaillargeon@gmail.com for review.

Keep an eye out on our social media channels—there will be a few moments in our queer history shared every month!

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What Happened on this Day in Queer History?

What Happened on this Day in Queer History?

Day of Silence
[“Day of Silence” by Gitgat is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0]

By: Jeff Baillargeon

A new project inaugurated by our publication on the Day of Silence, April 24th, What Happened on this Day in Queer History consists of a series of critical short essays paying homage to the important events that have shaped queer history in Canada.

As a form of community engagement, this initiative seeks to celebrate important cultural and political milestones, such as the decriminalization of homosexuality in 1969, or the airing of the first episode of Coming Out in 1972, the first Canadian television program specifically targeted to a queer audience. While paying homage to well-known events, the project also seeks to raise awareness about the work that is done ‘behind the scenes,’ and the work that is still left to be done. In doing so, it seeks to bring to light the marginalized—or since forgotten—events formative to our history. These, for example, include the partnering of the Toronto-based AIDS Action Now!, the Montreal-based Réaction-SIDA, and the New York-based ACT UP in 1989, who, in storming the stage of the 5th International AIDS conference in Montreal to protest their exclusion from the event, were ultimately responsible for securing the presence of activist groups at future conferences. Though a celebration of triumphant moments, the What Happened on this Day in Queer History? will also shed light on the darker moments in our history that served as catalysts for greater cultural and political change within the queer community, and Canadian society more generally. These include the bathhouse raids of the 70s and 80s, and the tragic murders and assaults of countless queer individuals.

As a form of community engagement this initiative is also an invitation for the community to write back to us. The practice of writing history is always incomplete, there are always events and peoples who have been overlooked, or overshadowed. It is our hope that in extending this project to you, we can bring to light these hidden histories. If you have any moments in history you would like to see broadcast on The ArQuives’ platforms, please email them to jeffmbaillargeon@gmail.com for review.

Keep an eye out on our social media channels—there will be a few moments in our queer history shared every month!

Leave a reply

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Telephone: 416-777-2755
Email: queeries@arquives.ca

Street Address:
34 Isabella Street
Toronto, ON M4Y 1N1

Mailing Address:
The ArQuives
P.O. Box 699
663A Yonge Street
Toronto, ON M4Y 1Z9

PUBLIC HOURS

6:30 pm - 9:00 pm Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm Friday

Please note that The ArQuives offices will be closed for winter holidays from December 21, 2019 to January 6, 2020. We will resume normal hours on January 7, 2020. All reference requests made to queeries@arquives.ca after December 12, 2019 will be answered in January 2020.

NOTE TO RESEARCHERS:

Some of our materials are stored off site. Before visiting the archives, please send us an email at queeries@arquives.ca listing in detail the topics and sources that you wish to consult and we will let you know when they will be available. We aim to respond to email inquiries within 4 business days.


The ArQuives is located on the lands of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, Haudenosaunee, the Anishnaabe and the Huron-Wendat. Today, Toronto is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land.

The ArQuives strives to gather the stories of the unheard and silenced voices of the 2SLGBTQ+ first peoples of this land. We acknowledge that some stories have already been lost, and we aim to ensure that those that remain and those that are to come are preserved for the future.

The ArQuives has an access ramp to the front door and a lift from the first floor to the second floor. There are volunteers available to operate the lift. 

 There is an accessible washroom on the first floor. All washrooms are gender-neutral. 

 The ArQuives is a scent-free environment. 

 Please contact The ArQuives if you have any specific questions about accessibility that we can help with at queeries@arquives.ca.